Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 4/29/16

DEY takes a look at news making noise on social media.

Valerie Strauss reports on the kindergarten testing mess in Michigan. DEY weighs in:

Some bad news for kindergartners in Michigan

Via The New York Times:

Pearson Under Fire for Monitoring Students’ Twitter Posts

The Conversation on why play is vital to young children:

Kindergartners get little time to play. Why does it matter?

Psychology today reports on how electronics affect the developing brain:

Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

Senior Advisor Nancy Carlsson-Paige Reflects on the 2016 Network for Public Education Conference

The 2016 Network for Public Education Conference, held April 15-17 in Raleigh, NC, is truly an experience—something hard to describe.  For a few days in April, education and social justice activists from around the country come together in a burst of energy and synergy to share lives and ideas and to build an education movement for equity and justice for all children.

I was glad that Denisha Jones, DEY National Advisory Board member, and I attended because our session was the only one focused exclusively on young children.  Our panel was called T-E-S-T and Not PLAY is a Four-Letter Word:  Putting the Young Child and the Teacher at the Center of Education Reform.  Susan Ochshorn, early childhood author and journalNPE 2016 3ist, moderated, and we were joined by Michelle Gunderson, first grade teacher and early childhood leader in the Chicago Teachers Union. We covered many issues in a short time including the decrease in play and active learning in classrooms for young children, the disproportionate effects of corporate education reform on black and brown children and those in low-income communities, and the need to strengthen our advocacy for young children.  Lots of folks attended the session and I was really glad we were there to connect early childhood issues to the larger landscape of education reform that were the focus of the conference.

Many people came up to me over the course of the three days in Raleigh to tell me how they follow DEY, appreciate us, and benefit from using our materials.  It was really heNPE 2016 2artening to realize that we are voicing important ideas and issues that might otherwise not be accessible to teachers and parents.  People are using the papers we’ve put out in a variety of ways as well as our fact sheets, and many say they read our website regularly.

At the conference, we learned about many new documentary films being made about the current state of education in our country.  All of these films and how to order them are listed on the NPE website.   In a separate session we saw a “fine cut” preview of the almost finished documentary Backpack Full of Cash.  This film is being made by Sarah Mondale and Vera Aranow who made the PBS series called SCHOOL which received so much acclaim.   Their new film unwraps the movement to privatize our nation’s schools, telling a straightforward and understandable narrative through the eyes of the communities affected.   The film should be out in the coming year and I think its time is right.

On Saturday, we listened to a riveting keynote speech from Reverend William Barber, president of the North Carolina chapter of NAACP, about the history of racism in our schools and the continuing reality of systemic racism that permeates our society today.  Rev. Barber is a gifted orator who can move his listeners to new levels of awareness by his artistic crafting of words and powerful delivery.Themes of charter schools, over-testing, privatization, racial justice, poverty, global education, democracy, and public education ran through the speeches and sessions of the conference, helping all of us to heighten our understanding and also our resolve to continue our work.  I felt re-energized about our work at Defending the Early Years, proud of what we do, sure that we should keep on.

Maybe next year YOU will want to attend the Network for Public Education conference—you won’t be disappointed!

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Livestream DEY Session at the NPE Conference: Saturday, April 16 at 2:30 EDT

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DEY Senior Advisor Nancy Carlsson-Paige and DEY National Board member Denisha Jones will join Susan Ochshorn and Michelle Gunderson in a panel discussion entitled, “T-E-S-T, not P-L-A-Y is a Four-Letter Word: Putting the Young Child and the Teacher at the Center of Education Reform” during the third annual Network for Public Education conference, held in Raleigh, North Carolina.  The session will be held on Saturday, April 16 from 2:30 to 3:45 pm (EDT). Livestream their session by clicking here. Several other keynotes and sessions will be livestreamed as well.

Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 4/8/16

DEY takes a look at news making noise on social media. The 2016 Opt Out movement is in full force and making news:

Via the Village Voice:

New York Opt-Out Rates Remain High, Tests Remain Massively Confusing

The New York Post:

‘Opt out:’ Teachers email parents to boycott Common Core tests

The New York Daily News:

NYC Opt Out group wants parents to know ‘they have a choice’

Politico:

Thousands opt out of state English exams, early data shows

CNN:

Testing time at schools: Is there a better way?

And then there is this: A powerful and spot-on opinion piece posted by Jamila Carter via Edushyster:

In an Effort to Keep Our Kids Safe, We May be Silencing Their Voices

 

Miami Parents Petition for More Time for Recess and Play

playground The front page of the March 28, 2016 edition of the Miami Herald, featured a nearly full page article about the efforts of parents in South Florida to demand more recess time for their young children.  After Florida’s legislature failed to pass a law mandating recess during the current session, parents decided to fight for their children’s right to play.  They have so far gathered over 6,000 signatures on a petition demanding a minimum of 20 minutes per day of recess for pre-K, kindergarten, and elementary school students in the Miami-Dade public schools. Find their petition at Change.org here.

“Kids need recess,” Paula Zelaya, parent of a first grader at Downtown Doral Charter School, was quoted as saying.  “I think that they do better if they have a space to relax.”

Experts agree.  Dr. Peter Gorski, a member of the national executive committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics and a Miami pediatrician, mentioned the lack of play in today’s schools and the new standards for teaching and learning.  “They are defeating their very academic purpose by denying or cutting back on free, supervised play.”  He went on to say that activities such as a video-led dance break called GoNoodle isn’t a substitute for child-directed, free play when children can choose what they want to do and who they want to play with. “Imaginative play can only happen when there’s free choice involved.  Every child needs to dream, needs to imagine, needs to commuicate.”

The petition calls for a scheduled recess time, preferably outdoors, and that it should not be a substitute for physical education.

 

 

Learning to Count to 14 the Common Core Way and the DAP Way…

Learning to Count to 14 the Common Core Way and the Developmentally Appropriate Way – What is the Difference? Why Does it Matter?

Unfortunately, in too many kindergartens today, even many of the best trained teachers in play-based, developmentally appropriate practice say they are being pressured into teaching fact-based, “one-size-fits-all” math lessons and find that play-based activities are severely curtailed, if not banned.  This situation deprives young children of the opportunities they need now more than ever to develop a meaningful foundation for mathematical concepts in developmentally appropriate ways (Kamii, 2015; VanHoorn, 2015).  It undermines their ability and enthusiasm to use math to figure out real problems in the real world.  And having these meaningful learning experiences with math in school is increasingly important in today’s world, as media and technology take up more and more of the time many young children used to spend developing the foundations for mathematical thinking in their own uniquely created hands-on play activities at home (Levin 2013). If we want to optimize young children’s early math development and learning, we much return to high-quality, play-based activities, where well-trained teachers connect math learning to how children learn and to individual children’s interests and needs (Exchange, Jan./Feb. 2016).

Please read more in thmathforexchangee attached article by DEY’s Senior Advisor, Diane E. Levin and DEY’s co-director, Geralyn Bywater McLaughlin, which was originally published by Exchange Magazine in the Jan/Feb 2016 edition.

 

DEY Releases “Straight Talk about Kindergarten Readiness Assessment”

What is kindergarten readiness assessment?  Why is Defending the Early Years concerned about the current state of readiness assessment?  What can parents, teachers, and policymakers do about inappropriate kindergarten assessment?

Answers to these questions and more can be found in DEY’s newest report, “Straight Talk About Kindergarten Readiness Assessment,” written by Stephanie Feeney, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Education at the University of Hawaii and a member of DEY’s National Advisory Board.

Download the report below.  There are two versions available, one with full color photos and the other without photos for easier copying:

Kindergarten assessment with photos FINAL March 2016

Kindergarten assessment no photos FINAL March 2016

Kindergarten assessment cover