Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 5/13/16

DEY takes a weekly look at news making noise on social media.

Valerie Strauss reports on a victory over VAM:

A master teacher went to court to challenge her low evaluation. What her win means for her profession.

Via The Daily News, Success Academy under investigation:

EXCLUSIVE: Success Academy charter school probed over alleged bias against disabled kids

Alan Singer via Huffington Post reports: After seven years of Common Core curriculum and assessment, the results are in:

Results Are in: Common Core Fails Tests and Kids

Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 4/29/16

DEY takes a look at news making noise on social media.

Valerie Strauss reports on the kindergarten testing mess in Michigan. DEY weighs in:

Some bad news for kindergartners in Michigan

Via The New York Times:

Pearson Under Fire for Monitoring Students’ Twitter Posts

The Conversation on why play is vital to young children:

Kindergartners get little time to play. Why does it matter?

Psychology today reports on how electronics affect the developing brain:

Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 4/8/16

DEY takes a look at news making noise on social media. The 2016 Opt Out movement is in full force and making news:

Via the Village Voice:

New York Opt-Out Rates Remain High, Tests Remain Massively Confusing

The New York Post:

‘Opt out:’ Teachers email parents to boycott Common Core tests

The New York Daily News:

NYC Opt Out group wants parents to know ‘they have a choice’

Politico:

Thousands opt out of state English exams, early data shows

CNN:

Testing time at schools: Is there a better way?

And then there is this: A powerful and spot-on opinion piece posted by Jamila Carter via Edushyster:

In an Effort to Keep Our Kids Safe, We May be Silencing Their Voices

 

Learning to Count to 14 the Common Core Way and the DAP Way…

Learning to Count to 14 the Common Core Way and the Developmentally Appropriate Way – What is the Difference? Why Does it Matter?

Unfortunately, in too many kindergartens today, even many of the best trained teachers in play-based, developmentally appropriate practice say they are being pressured into teaching fact-based, “one-size-fits-all” math lessons and find that play-based activities are severely curtailed, if not banned.  This situation deprives young children of the opportunities they need now more than ever to develop a meaningful foundation for mathematical concepts in developmentally appropriate ways (Kamii, 2015; VanHoorn, 2015).  It undermines their ability and enthusiasm to use math to figure out real problems in the real world.  And having these meaningful learning experiences with math in school is increasingly important in today’s world, as media and technology take up more and more of the time many young children used to spend developing the foundations for mathematical thinking in their own uniquely created hands-on play activities at home (Levin 2013). If we want to optimize young children’s early math development and learning, we much return to high-quality, play-based activities, where well-trained teachers connect math learning to how children learn and to individual children’s interests and needs (Exchange, Jan./Feb. 2016).

Please read more in thmathforexchangee attached article by DEY’s Senior Advisor, Diane E. Levin and DEY’s co-director, Geralyn Bywater McLaughlin, which was originally published by Exchange Magazine in the Jan/Feb 2016 edition.

 

Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 3/11/16

DEY takes a look at news making noise on social media:

Learning Lab provides an inside look at “broken windows” discipline at Boston turnaround school.

What Discipline Looks Like at A Boston School With 325 Suspensions

Valerie Strauss/The Washington Post reports: Florida denies parent request for required recess.

Parents sought required recess for their kids at school. Florida Senate said no. 

William Doyle/The Hechinger Report takes a look at Finnish schools and why they’re succeeding:

How Finland broke every rule – and created a top school system

As the testing obsession spirals out of control, the New York Times reports several California schools will test for joy and grit:

Testing for Joy and Grit? Schools Nationwide Push to Measure Students’ Emotional Skills.

Testing for Joy and Grit? DEY And The Early Childhood Community Weigh In

On February 29th The New York Times published the following article: Testing for Joy and Grit? Schools Nationwide Push to Measure Students’ Emotional Skills. In an excerpt the article explains:
…starting this year, several California school districts will test students on how well they have learned the kind of skills like self-control and conscientiousness that the games aim to cultivate — ones that might be described as everything you should have learned in kindergarten but are still reading self-help books to master in middle age.
 
A recent update to federal education law requires states to include at least one nonacademic measure in judging school performance. So other states are watching these districts as a potential model. But the race to test for so-called social-emotional skills has raised alarms even among the biggest proponents of teaching them, who warn that the definitions are unclear and the tests faulty.
DEY’s Senior Advisor (and several other ECE experts) weigh in below:

 

Nancy Carlsson-Paige: 

Testing children’s social and emotional skills is a bad idea.  These skills are crucial to school success and life long happiness—we’ve seen this through many research studies. But skills such as self and social awareness, managing emotions, developing empathy, forming positive relationships, and learning conflict resolution skills grow over time in children and from the inside out.  They develop in children as the result of interactions with others in classrooms that foster these skills through the curriculum, relationships, and activities specifically designed to encourage social and emotional skill building.

Research shows that reward systems can influence social and emotional behavior, but the learning does not last once the rewards are removed.  We want children to be kind and feel empathy for others even when the teacher isn’t looking or the promise of earning points isn’t there.  Research has also shown that self reporting does not match up with actual behavior.  Most importantly, we learn from moral development theory that the more we try to control children from the outside, the less they learn to regulate themselves from within.
Building skills for social and emotional awareness and skill should permeate every classroom and be encouraged in every child.  It’s  essential for their success in school and in life.  But testing these skills will only undermine that vital goal.
Eric Schaps/Founder, Developmental Studies Center: 
The challenge of assessing SEL skills in any affordable, feasible, large-scale way is that such assessments are — inevitably — vulnerable to social desirability and social pressure influences. Those vulnerabilities become all the greater as the assessments become high stakes and as pressures mount on schools to “look good.”
Linda Lantieri/ Educator and Author of Building Emotional Intelligence:
It is helpful to have a sense of how much progress is made when social and emotional learning is taught in schools. However there are other creative ways besides testing to do that. For example, schools could use Portfolio Assessment to assess competence. Students could reflect and journal over time on how they approach certain conflict situations  or how they strengthen certain relationships and discuss how they are using their learned SEL skills to do that. Progress in this area is best when assessment is used  for the purpose of self improvement and differentiation of instruction.
William Crain; Professor of Psychology, The City College of New York: 
For over three decades, many of us have been concerned about the impact of the standards movement on children’s emotions.  Increasing academic and testing demands, imposed at younger and younger ages, have been producing considerable stress.  What’s more, the single-minded focus on academics has crowded out important areas of children’s lives—artistic activities, the exploration of nature, and the development of social and imaginative capacities through play.   I have often felt that children frequently seem so lethargic and unhappy not only because they are stressed out, but also because they haven’t had a chance to develop their full potentials. Their development atrophies, and they feel stagnant.
Recently, some standards advocates have become more alert to children’s social and emotional problems and needs.  They want to teach and test for social-emotional skills.  But I doubt that their approach will work.
They, like the standards movement in general, assume that it’s up to us, as adults, to decide what children should learn.  Standards advocates fail to see that children have an inner drive to develop different capacities at different ages, and when given a chance to do so, children spontaneously engage in activities with great enthusiasm and perseverance.
Educators need to take a more child-centered approach, taking their cues from children, seeing what children themselves are ready and eager to learn.  If educators did this, they would find that children naturally develop a wide-ranging passion for learning–for books, nature, and people. Educators would see that children naturally stick with tasks they care deeply about.  The need to teach and test for social-emotional skills wouldn’t arise.
Lastly, for more thoughts on “grit” we point you to Alfie Kohn’s piece Grit: A Skeptical Look at the Latest Educational Fad.

 

 

Highlights from Facebook and the Twittersphere: 2/26/16

DEY takes a weekly look at news making noise on social media:search

Education Week published commentary by DEY’s Diane Levin and Denisha Jones on why preschool suspensions are harmful.

Here’s Why Preschool Suspensions Are Harmful

The New York Times reports: Latest Success Academy video incident covered up for over a year.

Mother of Girl Berated in Video Assails Success Academy’s Response

Education Week profiles Steve Oats. This leader to learn from is bringing play back to Kindergarten in N.C.

In N.C. District, Leader Brings Play Back to Kindergarten